Archive for the ‘Dementia Care’ Category

Handle the Hardest of Dementia Symptoms – Secret Tools from San Jose In Home Care Experts

July 25th, 2017

Handle the Hardest of Dementia SymptomsFor individuals caring for a senior struggling with Alzheimer’s disease or another kind of dementia, a number of complicated effects need to be very carefully handled, but possibly the most difficult of dementia symptoms to handle are the hallucinations and the illusions, and the suspicions that other individuals are out to cause injury or harm. Incorrect perceptions such as these happen most commonly in the late stages of progressive dementia due to changes within the brain. It’s essential to first understand the reason behind these emotions and behaviors, and to address the underlying cause.

Hallucinations/Illusions

Causes for hallucinations may be the result of a general confusion, a medicine side effect or an infection. Talk to the health care provider to rule out medication side effects or infections, but also pay attention to the person’s environment.

For example:

  • If the person complains about hearing someone talking: Is a TV or radio on nearby that could be causing the issue?
  • If the person believes he or she is always being watched: Try pulling the drapes closed over the windows.
  • If the individual sees insects moving across the table: Is there a patterned tablecloth that may be triggering the perception?

When illusions do occur, don’t debate about whether or not they are real, but instead evaluate the circumstance, assure the individual in a serene voice and change the person’s environment as necessary or respond to the individual’s feelings.

For instance:

  • “I do not see any bugs on the table, but you seem anxious, so let’s go into the living room until they can be gotten rid of.”
  • “You believe you saw a person in that side of the room? Let’s turn the light on over there so we can see more clearly. Would that help you feel more at ease?”

Suspicions/Accusations

A person with dementia might accuse other people of stealing things, of unacceptable behavior or of betrayal. This may possibly be due to a general confusion or memory loss, but might also be a way for the person to express anxiety.

How to respond:

  • Take “no” out of your vocabulary. Don’t disagree, become offended or try to persuade the senior otherwise.
  • Reassure him/her, permitting him or her to share feelings.
  • Try and come up with a simple answer to the complaint.
  • Redirect, such as by distracting the individual with another activity.
  • Respond to the requirement instead of the words.
  • Obtain duplicates of regularly lost objects, for instance a purse or wallet. If one is lost, the alternate can be given to the person.

It is no doubt that providing care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease can be complicated at times. It’s critical to depend on the support of others for guidance, resources and respite from the everyday responsibilities. Call on the San Jose in home care experts at Visiting Angels to provide top notch caregivers who are specially trained in the art of patient, innovative dementia care strategies to ensure your loved one is safe, comfortable and living life to the fullest. Contact us online or call us at 408-610-9996.

How to Handle Memory Loss for Better Dementia Care | San Jose, CA

July 12th, 2017

Alzheimer’s disease can alter someone’s mind so that recollections regarding current happenings are forgotten or mixed up while those from the more remote past often stay intact. The memory loss of more current events can also cause earlier times to make more sense to an individual with Alzheimer’s disease. A person’s alternate reality can be his/her strategy of making sense of the present through past memories.

Older adults with dementia or Alzheimer’s may have problems expressing themselves, and in some cases their alternate reality has more to do with a need or a specific feeling they are attempting to express than it has to do with the things they are saying.

For instance:

  • “When is my wife going to be home?” This question could possibly be more about a need for affection or acceptance or a home cooked meal than it could be about wanting to see his wife, who died a number of years ago. The right answer to learn more might be, “Why do you want to see her?”
  • “I need to deliver all these casseroles to the neighbors before the end of the day.” Though these casseroles don’t exist, the words may indicate a need for intention in daily life or desiring to be engaged in an activity. An appropriate answer to discover more could be, “Why did you make casseroles for your friends?”

Maintaining a record of these kinds of happenings could help you see trends in needs. The more you listen and pay close attention, the easier it will be to understand the reasoning behind the alternate reality and how to best react.

Should You Play Along?

Provided that the scenario is not going to be dangerous or inappropriate, it is fine to play along with the older person’s alternate reality. Doing so will not make the dementia worse. Remember, your loved one’s reality is true to the person and going along with it can make your loved one feel better.

If the scenario is inappropriate or may cause danger to the senior, try to react to the perceived need while redirecting the individual to something less harmful or more appropriate.

Keep in mind these 3 steps:

  1. Reassure the individual.
  2. Respond to his/her need.
  3. Redirect if required.

Also, call on the expert in-home care services of Visiting Angels for dementia care in San Jose, California. Our caregivers are experts in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease and can provide respite care services for family caregivers who need some time to refresh and recharge. Contact us online or call us at 408-610-9996.