Archive for the ‘San Jose’ Category

Protection from Bed Sores – Tips from the San Jose In-Home Care Experts at Visiting Angels

August 30th, 2017

bed soresAffecting around one out of every ten seniors, and even more widespread in smokers, in those with chronic diseases such as diabetes, or whose skin is more delicate, bed sores (also known as pressure sores or pressure injuries) are not just very painful – they can rapidly advance to infections that can extend to the bloodstream and even end up to be deadly.

For those with reduced mobility or who are confined to a bed or wheelchair, and those who care for them, the struggle against pressure sores can seem never-ending. Ensuing from a decrease of blood flow when staying in one position for too long, it is vital for those caring for an older loved one to become educated about pressure sore protection. Try some of these guidelines from our San Jose in-home care experts to help protect your loved one’s sensitive skin from these dangerous sores:

  • Frequent Position Changes
    • Every hour if confined to a wheelchair, every two hours if confined to bed
    • Utilize lifting instruments when possible to eliminate friction during repositioning
  • Support
    • Utilize specialized cushions and pads:
      • In between knees and ankles
      • Under calves to protect heels
      • To lie at an angle, protecting hips
  • Skin Care
    • Utilize mild soap and warm (not hot) water and apply moisturizing cream
    • For extremely moist skin, use talcum powder
    • Massage areas prone to pressure sores to enhance circulation
  • Healthy Nutritional and Activity Choices
    • Check with your loved one’s doctor for dietary and supplement recommendations for maximum skin health
    • Ensure good hydration
    • Stop smoking
    • Frequent exercise (as appropriate and per physician’s suggestions)

If, despite taking these precautionary measures, your loved one develops a pressure sore, it will advance through the four stages below:

  • Stage 1: A reddish, blue or purple bruise-like patch on the skin can be noticed, which may be warmer than the surrounding skin and bring about sensations of itching or burning.
  • Stage 2: An open sore appears on the bruise, similar to a blister or abrasion. Discoloration and pain are often part of this stage.
  • Stage 3: As the sore worsens, the surrounding skin darkens and the area is deeper.
  • Stage 4: At this phase, damage occurs to the bone, muscle and/or joints, and osteomyelitis (a dangerous bone infection) or even sepsis (a potentially fatal infection of the blood) can take place.

Be sure to get in touch with your loved one’s physician immediately if a pressure sore is discovered. Visiting Angels can also assist by inspecting skin every day to identify susceptible areas of the skin and detect the early signs of bed sores, as well as provide assistance with ambulation, turning and transferring to decrease the risk of developing sores. We are just a phone call away. Contact us today for more information about our San Jose in home care services at 408-610-9996 or view our other service areas online.

The Keys to Proper Skin Care for the Elderly | Visiting Angels Senior Home Care, San Jose, CA

August 16th, 2017

Senior Home Care, San JoseAs we age, our skin tends to become dryer and more delicate. Reported by Medscape, as many as 75% of older adults endure dry, flaky skin, which not only is easily injured (scratched, bruised, or cut), but also typically causes uncomfortable itching.

The most prevalent areas for dry skin in the elderly are the elbows, lower legs, and forearms. For older adults who are less mobile than they were previously, dry skin could also play a role in the development of bed sores from remaining in one position too long in either a chair or bed.

Dry skin can also result from the loss of oil and sweat glands. If your senior loved one is encountering the irritation of overly dry skin, Visiting Angels’ senior home care in San Jose, CA and the surrounding area can assist! The following strategies below are also a great reference guide to proper skin care for the elderly.

  • Refrain from taking hot showers and baths. Warm water is less drying to the skin.
  • Encourage the elderly person to bathe less often if feasible. While personal hygiene is important, utilizing “dry baths” (with a damp towel) can be satisfactory between baths and showers.
  • Use mild soaps and shampoos on the older adult’s skin. If his or her scalp or skin is extremely dry, there are special products, such as Nizoral, that might help.
  •  Moisturize the senior’s skin well, specifically after bathing or showering.
  • Only use products that are unscented, as perfumed products could further aggravate the skin.
  • Be sure the elderly person drinks an adequate amount of fluids.
  • Consider making use of a humidifier in the wintertime or in dry climates.
  • If the person smokes, encourage him or her to quit.
  • Add stress-reducing activities into the older adult’s everyday schedule.
  • Ensure that he or she uses sunscreen when going outdoors, and limit exposure to the sun.

It’s a smart idea to look at your senior loved one’s skin on a regular basis to see if there are any signs of extremely dry skin, and seek medical care if necessary.

Serving the San Jose, CA area, our experienced staff at Visiting Angels can supply hourly or live-in care assistance with bathing and dressing, restroom use or incontinence, and many other personal care tasks to help keep seniors safe and in good health at home. We also supply a full range of in-home assistance with light housework, cooking, running errands, providing transportation, companionship, and so many other services for senior home care in San Jose.

Contact us at 408-610-9996 today to set up an in-home evaluation. We can help you and your loved one decide what level of care and services are best for his or her individual needs.

Handle the Hardest of Dementia Symptoms – Secret Tools from San Jose In Home Care Experts

July 25th, 2017

Handle the Hardest of Dementia SymptomsFor individuals caring for a senior struggling with Alzheimer’s disease or another kind of dementia, a number of complicated effects need to be very carefully handled, but possibly the most difficult of dementia symptoms to handle are the hallucinations and the illusions, and the suspicions that other individuals are out to cause injury or harm. Incorrect perceptions such as these happen most commonly in the late stages of progressive dementia due to changes within the brain. It’s essential to first understand the reason behind these emotions and behaviors, and to address the underlying cause.

Hallucinations/Illusions

Causes for hallucinations may be the result of a general confusion, a medicine side effect or an infection. Talk to the health care provider to rule out medication side effects or infections, but also pay attention to the person’s environment.

For example:

  • If the person complains about hearing someone talking: Is a TV or radio on nearby that could be causing the issue?
  • If the person believes he or she is always being watched: Try pulling the drapes closed over the windows.
  • If the individual sees insects moving across the table: Is there a patterned tablecloth that may be triggering the perception?

When illusions do occur, don’t debate about whether or not they are real, but instead evaluate the circumstance, assure the individual in a serene voice and change the person’s environment as necessary or respond to the individual’s feelings.

For instance:

  • “I do not see any bugs on the table, but you seem anxious, so let’s go into the living room until they can be gotten rid of.”
  • “You believe you saw a person in that side of the room? Let’s turn the light on over there so we can see more clearly. Would that help you feel more at ease?”

Suspicions/Accusations

A person with dementia might accuse other people of stealing things, of unacceptable behavior or of betrayal. This may possibly be due to a general confusion or memory loss, but might also be a way for the person to express anxiety.

How to respond:

  • Take “no” out of your vocabulary. Don’t disagree, become offended or try to persuade the senior otherwise.
  • Reassure him/her, permitting him or her to share feelings.
  • Try and come up with a simple answer to the complaint.
  • Redirect, such as by distracting the individual with another activity.
  • Respond to the requirement instead of the words.
  • Obtain duplicates of regularly lost objects, for instance a purse or wallet. If one is lost, the alternate can be given to the person.

It is no doubt that providing care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease can be complicated at times. It’s critical to depend on the support of others for guidance, resources and respite from the everyday responsibilities. Call on the San Jose in home care experts at Visiting Angels to provide top notch caregivers who are specially trained in the art of patient, innovative dementia care strategies to ensure your loved one is safe, comfortable and living life to the fullest. Contact us online or call us at 408-610-9996.

The Scientific Importance of Social Activities for Seniors

May 14th, 2017

The Scientific Importance of Social Activities for SeniorsIt seems intuitive to some people that interacting socially with others elevates wellbeing by maintaining connections to other people’s experiences, beliefs, problems, humor, opinions, and a host of other human happenings. Now, scientific studies are displaying the benefits of social activities for seniors that could boost the wellness of the brain and the body.

The results point clearly to the benefits of friendship and social interaction for the elderly. A study executed by Rush University Medical Center demonstrated that a person who was documented to have a high level of social activity was about twice as likely to remain free of an impairment with activities of daily living than somebody with a reduced level of social engagement, and about 1.5 times as likely to remain free of disability involving instrumental activities of daily living or mobility. Extremely social older persons had a 70% decrease in their level of cognitive decline when compared to their less social peers.

And yet, being social is not second nature to everybody, and for a number of people, it turns out to be harder with age because one’s ability to get around may become greatly diminished. Here are a few ways a home care agency such as Visiting Angels can help the elderly continue to be social and protect their wellbeing:

  • Promote attendance at and provide accompaniment to social outings like club meetings, community events such as fairs, holiday activities and parades, plays, concerts, and sports events, religious services and church activities.
  • Share in playing interactive games with seniors such as board games, cards and Nintendo Wii.
  • Arrange for visits with friends and neighbors.
  • Offer transportation to an adult day facility or a low impact exercise class.
  • Provide companionship during family celebrations or vacations for optimum comfort and safety.
  • Help older adults navigate social media sites like Skype and Facebook to enable them to connect with family and friends even when they are unable to leave the home.

In the Social Activity and Wellbeing of Older Australians Study, testing more than 6,000 older adults across about 5 1/2 years, seniors having frequent social engagement had a reduced decrease in intellectual and memory performance. Better mental capacity was maintained best in those people who were the most socially engaged.

Having a professional home care agency provide assistance to encourage and help with keeping a senior socially connected might be one of the most essential means to help him/her continue to thrive and feel alive. Visiting Angels’ in home care San Jose staff are all committed to supporting the independence, dignity, and social connectedness of every person we serve. To view our full service area in California, click here.