Posts Tagged ‘activities of daily living’

The Scientific Importance of Social Activities for Seniors

May 14th, 2017

The Scientific Importance of Social Activities for SeniorsIt seems intuitive to some people that interacting socially with others elevates wellbeing by maintaining connections to other people’s experiences, beliefs, problems, humor, opinions, and a host of other human happenings. Now, scientific studies are displaying the benefits of social activities for seniors that could boost the wellness of the brain and the body.

The results point clearly to the benefits of friendship and social interaction for the elderly. A study executed by Rush University Medical Center demonstrated that a person who was documented to have a high level of social activity was about twice as likely to remain free of an impairment with activities of daily living than somebody with a reduced level of social engagement, and about 1.5 times as likely to remain free of disability involving instrumental activities of daily living or mobility. Extremely social older persons had a 70% decrease in their level of cognitive decline when compared to their less social peers.

And yet, being social is not second nature to everybody, and for a number of people, it turns out to be harder with age because one’s ability to get around may become greatly diminished. Here are a few ways a home care agency such as Visiting Angels can help the elderly continue to be social and protect their wellbeing:

  • Promote attendance at and provide accompaniment to social outings like club meetings, community events such as fairs, holiday activities and parades, plays, concerts, and sports events, religious services and church activities.
  • Share in playing interactive games with seniors such as board games, cards and Nintendo Wii.
  • Arrange for visits with friends and neighbors.
  • Offer transportation to an adult day facility or a low impact exercise class.
  • Provide companionship during family celebrations or vacations for optimum comfort and safety.
  • Help older adults navigate social media sites like Skype and Facebook to enable them to connect with family and friends even when they are unable to leave the home.

In the Social Activity and Wellbeing of Older Australians Study, testing more than 6,000 older adults across about 5 1/2 years, seniors having frequent social engagement had a reduced decrease in intellectual and memory performance. Better mental capacity was maintained best in those people who were the most socially engaged.

Having a professional home care agency provide assistance to encourage and help with keeping a senior socially connected might be one of the most essential means to help him/her continue to thrive and feel alive. Visiting Angels’ in home care San Jose staff are all committed to supporting the independence, dignity, and social connectedness of every person we serve. To view our full service area in California, click here.

Bathroom Safety Tips for Seniors in Honor of National Bath Safety Month

January 24th, 2017

Bathroom Safety Tips for SeniorsHow could something that’s so comforting and relaxing, like a nice, warm bath, be one of the greatest dangers to seniors? The truth is, combining slick surfaces, slippery shampoo and very warm water create a number of potential hazards to seniors, especially the danger of falling – one of the most severe risks to older people.

January is set aside as National Bath Safety Month, and it’s a great opportunity for both training and assessment in bathroom safety for seniors.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that about 370 people of all ages suffer tub or shower-related injuries every single day in the USA. Because most falls in the home occur in the bathroom, AARP recommends taking the following preventative bathroom safety measures:

  • Put in grab bars for the toilet, shower, and tub
  • Install non-skid tile or use non-skid bath mats
  • Adjust temperature of the home’s hot water heater to 120 degrees F or less to prevent scalds
  • Provide a transfer bench to get in and out of the bathtub if susceptible to falling when stepping over the tub wall
  • Provide a bath chair to allow bathers to sit while bathing
  • Apply no-slip strips to the bathtub and shower floor, or provide a slip-resistant mat
  • Wipe up any water spills on the floor immediately

It’s also a wise idea to assess whether it might be worthwhile for a senior to utilize a mobile commode, which may be put at a bedside to ease nighttime bathroom needs. Bedside commodes can reduce the chance of evening falls, and can additionally be placed directly over the toilet, which is generally sturdier than a raised toilet seat. Features to look for when buying a commode:

  • Non-removable armrests
  • Rubber tips on the legs instead of wheels
  • A frame that is sturdy
  • Both a pail (with lid) and a sleeve (for use over the toilet)

Simple, basic commodes can cost anywhere between $60 and $250, although more complex, specialized commodes, such as those that have tilting mechanisms, can run as much as $3,000.

AARP also provides a handy bathroom safety checklist with design instructions which will help seniors and their families make the most appropriate home modification decisions so that they can avoid the potential hazards of the bathroom.

Visiting Angels of Fremont and Sunnyvale can also help with bathroom safety for seniors. We can provide an in-home safety evaluation and suggestions, and by providing expert, hands-on support at bathtime, can help ensure that seniors remain safe throughout all of their bathroom needs. Our care is always delivered with the utmost respect and regard for dignity and privacy. Contact us at 408.735.0977 or 510.284.0000 to learn more.

To Have a Bath or Not to Have a Bath? – Bathing Solutions for the Elderly

January 16th, 2017

Bathing Solutions for the ElderlyWhat feels finer than sinking into a warm, relaxing bath at the conclusion of a long, stressful day? While many of us relish the wonderful comfort that bathtime brings, for seniors, especially those struggling with the challenges of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, to have a bath is anything but blissful.

For a variety of reasons, such as memory problems, feelings of vulnerability, or physical distress from the pressure or temperature of the water, assisting a senior with washing can feel a lot more like entering a battleground.

Visiting Angels wants to help restore the pleasure of bathtime for both the senior and his or her caregiver with these bathing solutions for the elderly:

  • Ensure safety. Keeping the shower area clear of hazards is essential. Make certain that:
    • Grab bars and mats that are slip-resistant are strategically placed in and around the tub
    • The water temperature is comfortable (around 100 – 101 degrees is best)
    • Never leave a senior with dementia unattended in the bathroom
  • Be innovative. Who says one person’s bathtime experience has to be like everyone else’s? Try thinking outside of the box to discover what works best for your senior loved one:
    • If the senior appreciates music, try singing or playing some songs as a distraction
    • Try a “dry” bed bath using no-rinse soap, dry shampoo, and a warm, damp towel
    • Incorporate a seven-day bath, involving cleaning just a portion of the body each day over the period of a week
    • Assisting the older adult with both using the toilet and cleaning his or her body simultaneously can be effective for those experiencing a high degree of anxiety or agitation
  • Allow control. One of the most challenging aspects of being cared for is losing independence. Help the senior regain a sense of control through:
    • Offering choices
    • Enlisting his/her help (i.e., holding the washcloth or bottle of shampoo)

It may take some trial and error to discover what the best bathing solution is for your elderly loved one. They will pick up on any frustrations you’re feeling, which could increase the amount of agitation for everyone. A healthy dosage of patience and a sense of humor can go a long way towards helping senior loved ones relax.

For more tips on bathing solutions for the elderly, contact Visiting Angels. Our professional in-home senior care specialists can assist with a complete range of personal care services, including bathing, assistance with the restroom, dressing, hair care and skin care, and much more. Partnering with Visiting Angels of California enables family to spend more quality time with their senior loved one, and also to take a much-needed break to rest and recharge. Call us at 408.735.0977 or 510.284.0000 to learn more.

ADLs and IADLs and Why They Matter

September 25th, 2012

In your research for in-home care, you are likely to hear some unfamiliar terms. When assessing your care needs or those of your loved ones, terms like ADLs and IADLs will come up frequently. So just what do those terms mean and why do they matter?

ADL stands for “Activities of Daily Living”. A person’s Activities of Daily Living include the everyday personal care activities that are fundamental to caring for oneself and maintaining independence, such as bathing, grooming, dressing, toileting, eating, etc.

IADL stands for “Instrumental Activities of Daily Living”. These are activities related to independent living and are valuable for evaluating persons with early-stage disease, both to assess the level of disease and to determine the person’s ability to care for himself or herself. IADLs include activities like housework, medication management, money management, using the telephone, transportation, etc.

Assessing a person’s ADLs and IADLs is one of the first steps when developing an in-home care plan or determining an appropriate referral for care. A person’s ADL and IADL assistance levels will help establish the amount and type of care that is most suitable for that person.

If you or a loved one needs an in-home assessment of ADLs or IADLs, contact Visiting Angels in Alameda County at (510) 284-0000 or in Santa Clara County at (408) 735-0977 to schedule your assessment today.